Posts tagged art
Laura Ehlers

I was diagnosed with Lyme Disease in early 2013, after ten years of searching for an answer to my chronic migraines which turned into chemical sensitivities, mold sensitivities and neurological symptoms. My health became drastically worse about one month after I married my husband, when I moved into his home- a brand new starter house. You may not be aware that new building materials are highly toxic and give off chemicals such as formaldehyde in the form of a gas. Some people with strong bodies have no noticeable problems with this, but I was not one of those people. My body was so damaged from the Lyme Disease I did not yet know I had, that the chemical off gassing triggered downward spiral. We barely had a newlywed stage and jumped right into "in sickness and in health". The saddest part of this experience for me has been fighting for better health instead of being able to immerse myself into my marriage right away. I'm not able to work full time, because the stress of being mentally "on" for forty hours a week is too much for my adrenals to handle.

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Aviva Peltin

Q: Letting go. In the process of being diagnosed with Lyme Disease, what things have you had to sacrifice and let go of? And how do you cope and adjust to this new way of life?

Aviva: I became chronically ill the summer of 2010, the year before I thought I’d leave home and go to college in California. I thought life would be so different. Not following my prescribed timeline was incredibly painful. Especially when we are young, each age has symbolism attached. When you’re 18, you’re an “adult.” Having to stay home when all my friends had the opportunity to become independent, go on adventures, and see the world was really difficult.

I just turned 22. This age has personal significance attached as well. If everything had gone according to plan, I would be graduating college this year. Becoming chronically ill dramatically shifted my timeline. But, I like to believe that this timeline is going to bring me more opportunity, joy, and fulfillment than if everything had gone according to plan.

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Aly Shwedo

Q: Letting go. In the process of being diagnosed with Lyme Disease, what things have you had to sacrifice and let go of? And how do you cope and adjust to this new way of life?

Aly: My life now compared to my life two years ago barely resemble each other. I’ve had to give up pursuing my education, my job, my friends, my independence, and almost my entire way of living through this disease. I am still grieving the loss of my former life, but I think sacrifice is a much better word to use when it comes to chronic illness. Lyme disease strips you down to your core. It is easy to look at our situation as a negative experience, but I have been given more than I have sacrificed to this illness. I have gained compassion and respect for anyone affected by chronic illness and hardship. I have been shown what moments in life truly matter and have a greater appreciation for every opportunity that my health allows me to do something “normal”.

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Gemma Fernandez

Q: Letting go. In the process of being diagnosed with Lyme Disease, what things have you had to sacrifice and let go of? And how do you cope and adjust to this new way of life?

Gemma: I’ve been ill for over three years but recently we discovered I’ve been dealing with Lyme disease all this time. I’ve had to sacrifice my study, my internship and my job. I was studying to become a veterinary technician (specialized in surgery), I was an intern at a Veterinary Clinic but due to my illness I have had to put that on pause. I’m not sure when I will be able to start. Due to Lyme I had to quite my part-time job, so you can imagine the stress that it brings. I try to life from day to day and not let the stress get to me. Just because it isn’t working out right now, doesn’t mean it will never work out, right?

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